Resource Sharing

LINKS NEED TO BE REPLACED WHERE TEXT IS IN RED

(There is an increase in the NIH requiring Resource Sharing in the RFA’s – please check!)

Format:
Attach this information as a PDF file. See NIH’s Format Attachments page.

NIH considers the sharing of unique research resources developed through NIH-sponsored research an important means to enhance the value and further the advancement of the research. When resources have been developed with NIH funds, and the associated research findings published or provided to NIH, it is important that they be made readily available for research purposes to qualified individuals within the scientific community. See the NIH Grants Policy StData Sharing Policy or the NIH Grants Policy Statement, Section 8.2.3.1: Data Sharing Policy.atement, Section 8.2.3: Sharing Research Resources.

Data Sharing Plan: Investigators seeking $500,000 or more in direct costs (exclusive of consortium F&A) in any budget period are expected to include a brief 1-paragraph description of how final research data will be shared, or explain why data-sharing is not possible (for example human subject concerns, the Small Business Innovation Development Act provisions, etc.).

Specific FOAs may require that all applications include this information regardless of the dollar level. Applicants are encouraged to read the FOA carefully and discuss their data-sharing plan with their program contact at the time they negotiate an agreement with the Institute/Center (IC) staff to accept assignment of their application. For more information, see the NIH

Sharing Model Organisms: Regardless of the amount requested, all applications where the development of model organisms is anticipated are expected to include a description of a specific plan for sharing and distributing unique model organisms or state why such sharing is restricted or not possible. For more information, see the NIH Grants Policy Statement, Section 8.2.3.2: Sharing Model Organisms.

Genomic Data Sharing (GDS): Applicants seeking funding for research that generates large- scale human or non-human genomic data are expected to provide a plan for sharing of these data. Examples of large-scale genomic data include genome-wide association studies (GWAS), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) arrays, and genome sequence, transcriptomic, epigenomic, and gene expression data. Supplemental Information to the NIH GDS provides examples of genomic research projects that are subject to the Policy. For more information, see the NIH GDS Policy, the NIH Grants Policy Statement, Section 8.2.3.3: Genomic Data Sharing (GDS) Policy/ Policy for Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), and the GDS website.

Note on GDS: For proposed studies generating human genomic data under the scope of the GDS Policy, an Institutional Certification may be submitted at the time of application submission, but it is not required at that time. The Institutional Certification, however, will be requested as Just-in-Time (JIT) information prior to award. The Institutional Certification, or in some cases, a Provisional Institutional Certification, must be submitted and accepted before the award can be issued.

Admin Grant Office Updated by JBou 09/01/.2020

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